#learning & #attitude – What if telling Girls they suck at Math & Science is making them well, suck at Math & Science?

All, Around the Web, Information, Opinion, Theory

Girls do better than Boys in Grade School

We did our homework, listened to the teachers, and generally wanted to learn.

Boys wanted to be boys. 

The boys goofed around, didn’t listen, but that didn’t mean they weren’t learning —they just weren’t always making the grades, they were not always a reflection of the grades they received.

Once we all reached high school, the disparities leveled out a bit more as subjects became more complex and classes more demanding.

Some people are just good at art while others excel in math or writing.

That’s not to say someone who excels at art isn’t capable of becoming very proficient at math or writing. 

Math was never a subject I excelled at naturally. I worked at understanding the concepts and eventually began to enjoy math because I knew what I was doing and was confident in my abilities. 

I love physics, science, computers, and math. The subjects or topics are not always easy to master but are always fascinating. 

I felt compelled and determined to understand and figure out how to make sense of the numbers, letters, graphs, and theories.


So, what is going on today’s school Girl’s – who are no doubt Smart & Capable – when it comes to Math and Science?

Somewhere along the way, these girls are loosing their confidence to learn and master math and science —

Girls report having lower levels of confidence in their math abilities and experiencing higher levels of anxiety when performing math-related tasks than boys.

Girls’ low level of confidence in their math and science abilities could ultimately impact their performance.

Organisation for Economic
Co-operation and Development 

When and Why are girls loosing their Confidence to perform in Math & Science?

Some where along the way, girls attitude towards math and science turns negative. A negative attitude toward learning something makes anyone not interested and less likely to retain the information —

Evidence strongly suggests that gender gaps in academic performance are not determined by innate differences in ability.

What if girls are hearing – from these studies, teachers, or even parents –  “one day math and science will be over your head, it’s been studied!”

Maybe instead of passively imposing a negative attitude on their ability to excel at math and science, more positive interaction with math and science need to occur first… 

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